London

England

Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of Great Britain is the world’s most visited city and the most populous city of all of the UK. As the largest city in the European Union, London is a world cultural capital, leading in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, tourism and more. London has been a major settlement for two millennia with the largest city airport system and over 300 spoken languages. The city still retains its original 2.9 km² medieval boundaries and has the oldest underground railway network in the world. London is home to numerous museums, galleries and libraries and contains four World Heritage Sites: the Tower of London; Kew Gardens, including the Palace of Westminister and Westminister Abbey; St. Margaret’s Church; and Greenwich, which defines the prime meridian of 0°. London is a historically elegant city full of history, landmarks, monuments, telephone booths and double-decker buses.

 

Camden Market

England

Near the Hampstead Road Lock of the Regent’s Canal in London, the buildings manifest into sculptures of the imagination, filled with colour and detail. Camden Market is a one-of-a-kind place with over 1,000 unique shops, stalls, bars and cafes selling crafts, clothing and fast food. These venues take merchandise displays to a whole other level with vividly unique spreads. Need new shoes? Look no further than the massive sculpted Vans that literally hang “off the wall.” Hungry? How about South African cuisine with a big warm welcome from a 20-foot high warrior statue? It is no wonder why Camden Market is the fourth-most popular attraction in London with approximately 250,000 visitors a week. The magical Camden Town includes the Camden Lock Market by the Regent’s Canal; the Stables Market, which was formerly Pickfords Horse Stables; Buck Street Market, which focuses on clothes; and the Inverness Street Market. Camden Market is a place full of life and imagination where crazy characters like the Mad Hatter can be spotted.

Trafalgar Square

England

In the city of Westminster in Central London lies one of the most famous public squares, Trafalgar Square. The name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain. The battle took place on October 21, 1805, off the coast of Cape Trafalgar in Spain. Trafalgar Square has been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King’s Mews. The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations and protests. At the centre of the square are an extensive water fountain and Nelson’s Column standing at 52 metres and guarded by four colossal lion statues. In the past, the square was a popular spot to feed pigeons and a booming zone to sell bird seeds. Now, due to health hazards, the sale of bird seeds stopped and the government used birds of prey to draw out the pigeons.

British Museum

England

The British Museum located in London, England is among the largest and most comprehensive museums in the world. The museum is dedicated to human history, art and culture with around 8 million permanent works. The museum was established in 1753 after physician, naturalist and collector, Sir Hans Sloane, gave King George II his collection of over 71,000 objects after his death in return for £20,000 to his heirs. The museum opened to the public January 15, 1759, and became the first national public museum in the world. The number of artifacts in the museum has grown along with the expansion of British colonization and the number of visitors a year has increased from 5,000 to 6 million.

Natural History Museum

England

The Natural History Museum located in London, England displays various life and earth-science specimens from different periods of history. There are about 80 million items in the museum and five main collections that exhibit plants, insects, minerals, fossils and animals. The museum contains many specimens collected by Charles Darwin and is widely known for its dinosaur skeletons and skeleton of a blue whale that hangs from the ceiling. The ornate terracotta building is extensively detailed and is typical of high Victorian architecture. The museum has been called “a cathedral of nature” due to its high-arched ceiling and terracotta mouldings that are meant to represent the past and present diversity of nature.